Fellows Profiles

Kosal Path PhD
Kosal Path PhD
Kosal Path PhD. is a lecturer in the Department of International Relations and Political Science at the University of Southern California. His current research project is entitled Survival after Genocide in Cambodia: A study of Social Adaptation in a Fragmented Society.
CKS Senior Fellowship
Senoir Fellow 2011-2012
Course Impression
The Center for Khmer Studies Fellowship has enabled me to conduct over 100 interviews in the Along Vent district, former Khmer Rouge stronghold, to study social adaptation of former Khmer Rouge (KR) cadres in post-genocide Cambodia. This study helps us not only make sense of how different groups reposition themselves to meet the requirements of new realities whereby they try to determine what kind of community, society, or country they envision but also assess how such patterns affect the process of social rehabilitation from simply tolerating to fostering restored connection with survivors. It helps me understand the motivations which underlie their narrative of heroism, patriotism, and personal sacrifices and their demand for empathy from survivors and the society at large. Today, a part of Cambodia is still imprisoned in the past. It is still the very authority they once willingly or unwillingly supported that still has them imprisoned in their own minds. What I have learned from this research is that only through specific steps involving 1) re-education and re-alignment of former KR cadres with historical truth and 2) continuous confrontation of the self and the KR system can allow social and moral rehabilitation of these former KR agents occur.

Matthew Kostua
Matthew Kosuta PhD. is a lecturer and assistant dean at the College of Religious Studies, Mahidol University in Thailand. His current research project is titled Astrology and Heavenly Bodies in Theravada Southeast Asia: History, Belief, Practice.
CKS Fellowship
Senoir Fellow 2011-2012
Course Impression
In October 2011 I officially started my fellowship with CKS with a three week residency in Cambodia. The fellowship covers my research into astrology in Thailand and Cambodia. Because I live and work in Thailand the trip to Cambodia is easy both in terms of travel and in adapting to the culture. The fellowship grant is a great help in covering my travel to and accommodation in Cambodia. Also because I have no real Khmer language skills I must employ a Cambodia research assistant. It also helps pay for all the consultations I have with astrologers and other diviners! The fellowship grant is particularly important for scholars based in the region because of our relatively low salaries. The other components of being a CKS fellow are very helpful too: having a base of operations in Cambodia, support in finding accommodation, research assistants etc. The big surprise in my research is: I cannot find an astrologer in Cambodia.
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Hart N. Feuer
Hart Feuer is an Academic Researcher (currently PhD Student) affiliated with the Center for Development Research (ZEF), University of Bonn, and the Germany National Center for Traditional Medicine (NCTM), Cambodia
CKS Fellowship
Junior Fellow 2004
Course Impression
The 2004 junior fellowship was my first chance to come to Cambodia and has laid the groundwork for 8 subsequent years of research in Cambodia, including masters and doctoral research. Through the fellowship I also made the academic, business and social connections that have been instrumental in orchestrating all of my subsequent work.
Current Activities
Currently completing a dissertation about ecological agriculture in Cambodia and the role of capitalism and alternative agriculture discourse. Also editing a book on civil society in Cambodia and Vietnam, due for completion in early 2013.
Recent Publications
Feuer, Hart N.. 2011. Negotiating Technical and Ideological Standards for Agroecological Rice Production in Emerging Markets: The Case of Cambodia. East Asian Science, Technology and Society, 5(4): 441-459. Feuer, Hart N. 2008. Sustainable Agricultural Techniques and Performance-Oriented Empowerment: An Actor-Network Theory Approach to CEDAC Agricultural and Empowerment Programmes in Cambodia. MPhil Thesis. University of Oxford, England. (The thesis based on research during my CKS fellowship): Feuer, Hart N. 2004. Social Capital, Market Interaction, and Income-generation Capacity: An Analysis of 2 Semi-rural Villages in Cambodia. BA Thesis. Lafayette College, Easton, Pennsylvania, USA.
Dr. Dennis Arnold
Dr. Dennis Arnold
Dr. Dennis Arnold is currently a Lecturer at the Globalisation and Development Initiative, Department of Technology and Society Studies, Maastricht University
CKS Fellowship
Senior Fellow 2009
Current Activities
Dennis’ research focus is political economy and development, with particular reference to (a) global production network governance mechanisms, (b) labor, migration and citizenship, and (c) borderlands and cross-border development initiatives in Mekong Southeast Asia. He does fieldwork in Cambodia, the Thailand-Myanmar border and Vietnam.
Recent Publications
Arnold, Dennis and John Pickles (2011) Global Work, Surplus Labor, and the Precarious Economies of the Border, Antipode, 43(5):1598-1624. Arnold, Dennis and Toh Han Shih (2010) A Fair Model of Globalisation? Labour and Global Production in Cambodia, Journal of Contemporary Asia, 40(3):401-424.
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Jenna Grant
Jenna Grant is a Doctoral Candidate in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Iowa, USA.
CKS Fellowship
Senior Fellow 2011
Current Activities
Jenna is currently completing her dissertation on medical imaging in Phnom Penh. Her 2011 CKS fellowship supported archival and interview research on the medical journal, Revue/Annales Médico-Chirurgicale de l’Hôpital de l’Amitié Khméro-Soviétique, published between 1961 and 1971.
Recent Publications
Grant, Jenna M. (in press, 2012) ‘The ethics bureaucrat’ in Figures of Southeast Asian Modernity. Joshua Barker, Erik Harms, and Johan Lindquist, eds. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press.
Grant, Jenna M. (in submission) ‘Cambodian Pathology’: Enacting biomedicine in a 1960’s Cambodian-Soviet medical journal. Journal of Southeast Asian Studies. (for special issue on the history of medicine, Laurence Monnais and John Dimoia, eds.)
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Neal Keating PhD
Dr. Neal Keating is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at The College at Brockport, SUNY Albany, USA. He is also affiliated with the American Anthropology Association International Working Group on Indigenous Affairs
CKS Fellowship
Senior Fellow 2011
Current Activities
Neal is currently invloved in ethnographic fieldwork in combination with archival and comparative ethnological research. Current foci include: 1. indigenous peoples and human rights in Cambodia 2. indigenous peoples, art, and human rights in Canada 3. indigenous peoples, art, and human rights in Guatemala
Recent Publications
2012 Iroquois Art, Power, and History. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. 2012 “From Spirit Forest to Rubber Plantation: The Accelerating Disaster of Development in Cambodia” under review in refereed journal, ASIANetwork Exchange. 2012 “Iroquoian Religion in the Seventeenth Century,” The Cambridge History of Religions in America: Volume I: Pre-Columbian Times to 1790, ed. by S. Stein. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. In press, scheduled for release in July 2012. 2011 “Art, Human Rights, and Trans-Anowaro Indigenous Art Exchange,” Invited Papers from Kexb’al kino’jib’al qawinaqil / Intercambio Americano de Artistas Indígenas. Guatemala City: Casa Ibargüen 2008 extended review of Two Essays: Chief & Greed (E. S. Carpenter), Museum Anthropology (32):78-81. 2007 “UN General Assembly Adopts the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, 144-4.” Anthropology News 48(8): cover, 22-23.
Thien-Huong T. Ninh
Thien-Huong Ninh
Thien-Huong is currently affiliated with the University of Southern California as a Doctoral Candidate and Williams College, Massachusetts as a Bolin Fellow (2012-2014)
CKS Fellowship
Senior Fellow 2010
Course Impression
It gave me the important opportunity to conduct research in Cambodia within a time frame of approximaitely 8 months. This opportunity had in turn enabled me to publish one journal article (up to date) as well attracting further financial support for my continued studies, establishing important networkings with colleagues in the field of Cambodian Studies, and advancing my Khmer language studies.
Recent Publications
Thien-Huong T. Ninh, 2011, “‘God Needs a Passport’: Vietnamese Caodaists in Cambodia Struggle for Religious and Ethnic Recognition across National Borders,” in “Religious Networks in Asia and Beyond,” edited by Peter van der Veer, special issue, Encounters: An International Journal for the Study of Culture and Society 4 (Fall): 133-160
John Munger
John Munger
John is currently a elementary school teacher at Schools of North America in Vietnam
CKS Fellowship
Senior Fellow 2009
Course Impression
The Fellowship from CKS changed the direction of my career. It led me to create a career in Southeast Asia in general, but specifically in Cambodia and Vietnam. I currently work in Vietnam, but am pursuing other career prospects in Cambodia concurrently. Without CKS I would likely not have the ties to Cambodia I have now. CKS was hands down, one of my best experiences in my college life.
Recent Publications
“Patrion-Client Ties: A Necessity During Democratic Kampuchea.” Searching for the TRUTH. Documentation Center of Cambodia. Second Quarterly Issue 2010
JudyLedgerwood
Judy Ledgerwood PhD
Judy is Professor of Anthropology at the Northern Illinois University
CKS Fellowship
Senior Fellow 2010
Current Activities
Professor Ledgerwood is a cultural anthropologist whose research interests include violence, memory, the re-construction of meaning in post-war and diaspora communities and gender. Her current research is focused on Cambodian Buddhism, violence and ideas of cultural identity. Professor Ledgerwood’s dissertation was on changing Khmer conceptions of gender in Khmer refugee communities in the United States.
Recent Publications
2008 At the Edge of the Forest: Essays on Cambodia, History and Narrative in Honor of David Chandler. Edited volume with Anne Hansen, Ithaca, NY: Cornell Southeast Asian Studies Program. 2011 Seeing Duch on Trial. Searching for the Truth First Quarter 2011, p. 53-56. (not peer-reviewed). 2010 Is the Trial of ‘Duch’ a Catalyst for Change in Cambodia’s Courts? AsiaPacific Issues, no. 95 (Honolulu: East-West Center, June, 2010), With Kheang Un. 2011 A Tale of Two Temples: Communities and their Wats IN Village Community and the Transforming Social Order in Cambodia and Thailand: Essays in Honor of May Ebihara. John Marston, ed. Melbourne: Monash University. [Selected for inclusion in the Human Area Relations
Courtney Work
Courtney Work
Courtney is a PhD candidate at Cornell University, USA.
CKS Fellowship
Senior Fellow 2009-11
Current Activities
Courtney is currently writing her dissertation and has presented papers on her field research at three professional conferences. She has also taught undergraduate courses related to her field of study and has engaged in outreach activities at local elementary schools through Cornell’s Southeast Asia Program.
Course Imppression
Working with CKS has put me in contact with the vibrant community of scholars currently working in Cambodia. This is an important group of individuals who are training students in language skills, facilitating collaboration and the sharing of research, as well as working with the new generation of native Khmer students who are ready to take on the challenges in this emerging democracy. The offices and classrooms at CKS are alive with intellectual activity and I am pleased to be an affiliated scholar.
Recent Publications
The spirits are crying: Re-envisioning land grabs in Cambodia through classical social theory, In review with the Journal of Peasant Studies. Merit in Motion: virtue and value in rural Cambodia, In review with the Journal of Contemporary Buddhism.